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European Coalition on Homeopathic & Anthroposophic Medicinal Products

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Manufacturing processes

Homeopathic medicinal products

Mother tinctures

The first step in the preparation of a homeopathic medicine from plant or animal starting material is the preparation of the ‘mother tincture’ (Ø). From chemical or mineral starting material, a first dilution is made. It can be a liquid dilution with ethanol/water or a solid dilution (a 'trituration') with lactose. All procedures, both the preparation of the mother tincture and the preparation of the first dilution or trituration, are performed according to a homeopathic manufacturing method given in the European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur), the German Pharmacopoeia (HAB) or the French Pharmacopoeia (Ph Fr).

Potentisation

PotentisationThe second step is a process of systematic serial dilution and ‘succussion’ (vigorous, rhythmic shaking with impact) known as ‘potentisation’, during which the most concentrated homeopathic preparation is 'potentised' with a dilution agent (usually ethanol, water or lactose).  The potentisation steps in a potency row can be performed in different dilution ratios:
D or X: 1:10
C or CH: 1:100
LM 1:50,000.

So, for example, D4 means potentised four times in the ratio 1:10. The higher the number of potency the lower the concentration.

Homeopathic medicinal products can be single remedies or complex products. The dosage forms comply with the European Pharmacopoeia.

Anthroposophic medicinal products

Anthroposophic medicinal products consist of starting material from plant, animal or mineral origin which are processed according to homeopathic methods, as described above, or according to specific anthroposophic methods. They can have only one or various active substances. The dosage forms comply with the European Pharmacopoeia.

GMP, shoesThe pharmaceutical processes by which anthroposophic medicinal products are developed reflects the relationship between human beings and the realms of minerals, plants and animal substances.

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Last updated on 22 Dec 2015